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A Scary Walk in the Père Lachaise Cemetery

A Scary Walk in the Père Lachaise Cemetery

Far from the madding crowd, in the east of the capital, is the Père Lachaise cemetery. Sprawled over 110 acres, this cemetery is the perfect place to escape the clamouring of the city and take a walk off the beaten track in an oasis of calm. It’s also the resting place of numerous famous authors, musicians and politicians. So if you’re looking for something unusual to do in Paris, head over to Père Lachaise for a unique experience.Visit the Père Lachaise cemetery with Laure, one of our specialist guides. She's a local journalist with a knack for all the best spots in the area!Père Lachaise takes its name from Père François de la Chaise, the confessor to Louis XIV, whose house had been on this site. In 1804 Napoleon opened the new cemetery. However, it would take years for the site to gain popularity, as it was considered to be too far from the city centre.Dismayed by the lack of interest in the new cemetery, officials had the remains of Molière and La Fontaine transferred to the site. This move proved to be hugely successful, and the cemetery had to be expanded five times to accommodate the growing number of graves. There are now over a million bodies buried at Père Lachaise, making it the largest cemetery in Paris.Numerous notable people have been laid to rest at Père Lachaise over the centuries, which has rendered it the most visited cemetery in the world. The most visited graves are those of Jim Morrison and Oscar Wilde, whilst singer Édith Piaf and writers Balzac and Proust also draw crowds. Père Lachaise is still a functioning cemetery, though there is now very limited space.Also of interest is the historic Mur des Fédérés (Communards’ Wall). On 28 May 1871, after losing a vicious battle against the French army amongst the tombs, 147 fighters of the Paris Commune were lined up against a wall, shot, and thrown into an open grave. The wall has been turned into a memorial to those fighters, and has become a symbol of the people’s struggle for liberty.

Top 5: Hidden Bars in Paris

Top 5: Hidden Bars in Paris

The term speakeasy entered the vernacular during the Prohibition era in the United States. These establishments were known for secretly selling bootlegged alcohol, and their name emerged from the need to speak quietly, so as not to alert neighbours or the police to their illicit activity. With the era of prohibition long gone, the term speakeasy is now used to describe retro bars that emulate those secretive watering holes. Many have popped up in cities across the world, and have gained popularity for their charm and uniqueness. Paris is no stranger to this trend, with bars hidden across the capital. All you need to do is know where they are…1) LavomaticEnter Lavomatic and you’ll think you’re in a normal laundrette. However, it’s not all that is seems. Whilst there are functioning washing machines, the real excitement lies behind a door disguised as a tumble dryer. Find the hidden button, climb the stairs, and you’ll find yourself in a charming bar. What Lavomatic lacks in size it more than makes up for in character. You’ll be greeted by friendly staff and there’s a good range of reasonably priced cocktails on offer. It opens at 6pm – get there early to be guaranteed a seat!Lavomatic, 30 Rue René Boulanger 750102) MoonshinerIf hidden doors are your thing, Moonshiner is the next place to go. Step into the restaurant Pizza Da Vito and head for the large walk-in fridge in the middle of the room. Push the door open, walk through the fridge (!), and you’ll find yourself in a true speakeasy. The décor emulates the understated style of the twenties, with retro barware and a permanent jazz playlist. If you’re looking to be transported back in time, this is the place to go!Moonshiner, 5 Rue Sedaine 750113) Experimental Cocktail ClubA veteran of the Paris hidden bar scene, the Experimental Cocktail Club is still going strong. Since its opening in 2007, the bar has not advertised, but simply relies on word of mouth to draw crowds to its unmarked door on a side street in the 2nd arrondissement. As its name suggests, the real strength of this bar is its cocktails, so feel free to go off-menu – the bartenders are more than up to it! The one downside: it’s one of Paris’ worst kept secrets, so expect a queue, especially on weekends.Experimental Cocktail Club, 37 Rue Saint-Saveur 750024) Le Ballroom du Beef ClubEvidently not content with the roaring success of their first bar, the creators of the ECC embarked on their second speakeasy venture, Le Ballroom du Beef Club. Hidden underground behind an unmarked black door, Le Ballroom is a dimly lit, velvet-coated gem in the centre of Paris. The drinks are up to the high standards of the ECC and the vibe is second to none. A perfect place to avoid the crowds and enjoy a night out with a twist!Le Ballroom du Beef Club, 58 Rue Jean-Jacques Rousseau 750015) Little Red DoorHidden away on a small street in the Marais is Little Red Door, its discrete façade only giving it away to people in the know. Slip in and you’ll find yourself in a laid-back bar, colourfully but tastefully decorated. Little Red Door offers a small but well-chosen selection of cocktails, and fantastic snacking food to accompany them. What’s more, the music is chosen by the staff to suit the mood, which means that no two visits are the same!Little Red Door, 60 Rue Charlot 75003Like the look of these bars? Alan, one of our nightlife Cariboos, will show you these bars (and more!). Check out the nightlife with a local!

Le Marais: A Walking Tour

Le Marais: A Walking Tour

A trip to Paris wouldn’t be complete without an exploration of le Marais. One of the oldest areas of the capital, the Marais has undergone several transformations over the centuries. Yet one thing has never changed: the Marais has always been trendy, cultural and an absolute must-see. So if you’re looking for things to do in Paris, there’s no better place to start!A Fascinating HistoryIn French marais means swamp, a name incongruous with the district’s current appearance, but nevertheless an accurate description of the region until the 12th century. 1240 marked the arrival of the Order of the Temple, and it was from this point onwards that the Marais was transformed from marshland to an attractive and vibrant district. The Temple built their fortified church in the area, followed by numerous other religious institutions. Over the following centuries, many notable royals chose to make the Marais their new home. In 1605, King Henri IV began the construction of the Place Royale (now known as Place des Vosges, the oldest square in Paris). French nobility duly followed, arriving en masse and building their enormous mansions, known as hôtels particuliers, each more imposing than the last. Most of these grandiose buildings still exist, and remain a major attraction of the Marais. When Louis XIV decided to move his court to Versailles, the nobility moved out, and rich merchants moved into the hôtels particuliers.Patrick is a professionally trained tour-guide, specialising in the Marais (amongst other areas!) Guaranteed to give you a fun, fact-filled tour!In the 19th century Baron Haussmann completely redesigned the streets of Paris, replacing the small winding streets with the wide grandiose boulevards now synonymous with the city. Somehow, though, the Marais survived this transformation. The district to keep its medieval charm, even if years of neglect had left the old buildings almost in ruins.After the Second World War the Marais underwent a full restoration, largely thanks to the Culture Minister Andre Malraux. He named the Marais the first secteur sauveguardé (protected area), ensuring its protection from modern development.Gabriel is an architecture student, born and raised in the Marais. He's passionate about the area and will take some great photos too!The Modern MaraisThanks to this restoration, the Marais became one of the most fashionable areas of the capital. The large hôtels particuliers were turned into museums, such as the Carnavalet Museum and the Museum of Hunting and Nature. This district is also home to the Pompidou Centre, the Picasso Museum, the Maison Européenne de la Photographie and the Arts et Métiers Museum. This plethora of galleries and museums has cemented the Marais’ reputation as one the city’s main cultural areas.The Marais is not, however, exclusively a cultural area. The area is filled to the brim with fashion outlets, and the abundance of restaurants and bars will ensure you don’t go hungry. In fact you could easily spend an entire day in this part of the capital and still not have time to see everything!If photography is your thing, Frédéric is the guide for you. He'll show you round the Marais and give you some expert tips on how to take the perfect photo.Since the 13th century, the Marais has housed the city’s Jewish community. Though new concept stores and fashionable bars have since moved in, this Jewish heritage is still thriving, especially around Rue des Rosiers. Moreover, the Marais is also home to the gay community in Paris – so there are plenty of gay clubs and bars in the area!The Marais is, without a doubt, one of the most popular areas in Paris. So if you’re looking for places to visit, make sure you set aside at least a day to explore the galleries, shops and restaurants!

The Fake Paris of World War I

The Fake Paris of World War I

In early 1918, Parisians were living in fear of an imminent aerial attack from the German Imperial Airforce. Given the rudimentary nature of anti-aircraft weapons at the time, Paris would be a sitting duck for a targeted attack by the German Gotha planes. Thus, the DCA (défense contre avions) came up with an inspired solution: create a replica of Paris to trick the German pilots.A map of the proposed dummy ParisThe Paris suburb of Maisons-Laffitte, just 15 miles from the capital, was chosen as the location for this dummy city. Quickly but quietly, French officials set to work constructing a realistic copy of Paris. They employed private companies to recreate Paris’ most famous monuments, including the Champs-Elysées and Gare du Nord. Functioning trains were installed and translucent paint applied to roofs to replicate the dirty glass of industrial factories.Work began on these detailed wooden reconstructions and the renowned electrical engineer Fernand Jacopozzi was hired to recreate the famous glow of the City of Lights. As radar had not yet been fully developed, the pilots would rely on the light from cities and railways to guide them towards their targets. The electrical engineer’s role, therefore, was vital. If he could create an illusion of Paris using light, the pilots would surely be deceived. Jacopozzi was rewarded with the Legion of Honour for his contribution to the war effort, and went on to create the first illumination of the Eiffel Tower.A dummy train, constructed from wood and illuminated.Despite the intense efforts put into the creation of the artificial Paris, most Parisians had no idea the construction was taking place. In fact, the details of the elaborate plan were only fully released in 2011 at the commemoration of the 93rd anniversary of the Armistice.The plan was ingenious in its simplicity. And yet the project was never fully realised. The last air raid on Paris took place in September 1918, at which point the second Paris was still being constructed. In November the war came to an end, and the fake Paris was quickly deconstructed. Today there is no trace of the remarkable plan. However, the legacy of military deception lived on, and the Second World War saw the use of artificial cities and inflatable tanks to deceive enemy bombers.As creative as this idea was, we think that Paris is and will always remain unique.For a tour of Paris during the Great War, contact... (whoops, we don't have one yet.)However, you can discover Paris during the Holocaust with Gabriel. Click here to see his profile.

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Frank Gehry's  Fondation Louis Vuitton

Frank Gehry's Fondation Louis Vuitton

Architecture is one of those art forms the impression from which, perhaps most than in other arts, is dependant on in situ perception. In this respect the building of Fondation Louis Vuitton by Frank Gehry (2014) is exactly the building to be observed and experienced on the spot. While photographs can present the general architectural idea of a building, and for some buildings even quite exhaustively, the true impression that FLV exerts can never be conveyed even by the best of the photographs. Despite that this is an absolutely abstract building without façades in its traditional meaning, still it has mainly four points of view and approach. One from the side of the street Mahatma Gandhi, where the main entrance is, the other-from the opposite side (from the garden) and two others from the respective corners of this overly rectangularly stretched composition of shapes and masses. And since we are dealing with a non-canonic building, naturally each point of view reveals a unique perspective on this incredible structure. View on the building from different angles The site Gehry wanted to create a dream architecture for Bernard Arnault, the CEO of LVMH who acted as his commissioner for the building for Louis Vuitton Fondation, saying “This project is a dream, so the first idea was to create a dream. I wanted to create a dream for Bernard, who has dreamed all of this”. He chose his beloved marine topic to sculpt this building as an architectural metaphor of a sailing-boat with its sails blown with the wind. This metaphoric depiction of a sailing-boat is particularly well perceived when approaching the building from the side of the metro station 'Les Sablons'. What you see first is a soaring nose of a ’boat' protruding like a gigantic wave over the shore. As you approach the building and continue walking towards the side of its entrance the building unfolds itself showing the range of sales stretched in line over a body of an imaginary boat. And since the space in front of the building from the side of the street is large not large enough to allow a full perspective of the building, I wonder what it would look like had it been placed in a larger area allowing wider perspective. On the other hand I imagine this building placed on a hill empowering its protruding sales with even more emphasised force of flight and movement. But obviously Arnault had reasons to chose exactly this place to erect his architectural monument. And even then, it was not that easy to obtain a permission for construction on the site of the Jardin d’Acclimatation. According to certain urban regulations any structure constructed in the neighbourhood of the protected Bois de Boulogne should not be higher than one floor. But Gehry found an architectural method to go over this law by actually not transgressing it at the same time. All the three floors of the building are mezzanine floors included in one uniform space. Thus one could argue that the building actually consists only of one floor-an argument which apparently seemed satisfying for the city authorities to give a green light to the construction. The developer also referred to the fact that the building itself is a unique piece of art the added value of which prevails over reasons of set regulations. After all the building in 65 years time will pass to city as its property. The idea However what you see from outside of the building has nothing to do with the inside. The 11 glass sales, which Gehry refers as to ‘verriers’ constitute the outside shape of the building which actually is a fake cover enveloping the main building of the museum. As Gehry notices himself, "you cant hang pictures on glass walls", hence he came up with this idea of creating a more or less traditional building of solid walls, referred as to an Iceberg which then was enveloped into the veil of 11 glass sales to realise the image that Gehry had in mind. The main building, referred as to an Iceberg, consists of volumes made of white Ductal fiber-reinforced concrete blocks which host the galleries and other functions of the museum. Gehry says, that he was very much inspired by the history of the Jardin d’Acclimatation and wanted to share its spirit by referring to the glass and metal structure of the Palmarium that once stood in the Jardine. Whilst the composition of curvy and intricate shapes of the building is typical for Gehry’s architecture, yet this is the first time that he actually has used glass as the main topic of his architecture to create ”...a glass building that is transparent, ephemeral, and like a cloud...” The glass sails are attached to the ‘Iceberg’ by means of metal girders and are held by curved wooden frames. All of these exposed wood and metal structure is argued to be exposed purposefully as again a reminiscent of late 19th century structural expressionist architecture such as the Eiffel Tower and the Palmarium. I personally would argue that its is rather formalistic ‘translation’ of that style or even an interpretation devised in retrospect to explain or justify somehow, in the words of Oliver Wainwright, the outcome of the efforts of “the designers wrestling with how on earth these apparently weightless petals will actually be supported”. Construction holding the sales and exposed beams in the interior Daniel Buren From 7 May 2016 till 11 May 2017 the colour art installation by Daniel Buren will be presented in the FLV, or I’d better say-presented on the building of FLV. The art of Buren evolves around colour, light, space, forms and architecture in general. He is, basically, ‘colours’ different buildings empowering it by such with a very different reading, exposing or emphasising its inner structural, geometric and aesthetic tensions and potentials. This is exactly what he did with the building of FLV. The sails are covered with staggered squares of different colour which completely change the image of this structure from romantic, mysterious and light marine vision to something playful and even cheeky. If one is lucky enough to visit the building in a sunny day, then one can observe the play of the colour glares from this colorful ‘patches’ decorating the interior spaces of the museum. Definitely another trick to emphasis the fairy, fantastic and magical atmosphere of this building! The inner space If Gehry had in mind to create an interplay of maze spaces in this building then, I must say, he succeeded well... Although after second time of visiting the building I started almost to be able to map its inner space completely! The whole building seems to have a landscape of its own. While the gallery rooms and movement from one room to another is pretty traditionally organised and is coherent so long as you follow the guiding signs, still the whole structure is ‘soaked’ in various spaces created by terraces, intermediate passages, staircases and patios which diversify the movement and raise experience of the building into the same level with the experience of the artworks presented. Gehry has been frequently accused in designing museum buildings which compete in dominance with the expositions inside. While the exposition spaces and the movement logic through galleries might be functionally organised, still I must confess that this constant offer of new spatial experiences of auxiliary spaces indeed distracts from concentrating on artwork exploration. Even such an extraordinary exhibition, as Chukin’s collection’s exhibition was, it couldn’t still keep my attention fully focused on the artwork only. I had to dedicate two different days one for the exhibition, the other to the building’s exploration. The main intriguing spaces, that constantly pop out from different corners of the building and tempt you to get diverted from your dedicated art-exploring route are the terraces and the promenade path arranged with the art work of Olafur Eliasson. The terraces are on different levels connected with each other by means of staircase in such a manner that the exploration of the terraces itself becomes a whole game of its own. You have an incredible view on Paris and the Jardin from all the angles of the terraces and the sails hoovering over it and even below it create an intricate net of spaces that challenge our traditional perception of space and scale. Olafur Eliasson’s yellow light and mirror installation responds to the general idea of this building. It creates another magical, fantasy space full of light and colours just as the building itself is (well, at least so long as Buren’s installation is in place enabling this building with another experiential dimension that of colour and glare). Olafur Eliasson's 'Inside the horizon' art installation in FLV Yet so long as experience of spaces are concerned, my favourite spatial moment in this building is the separate volume of the video-projection hall. This iceberg-resembling shape stands inside the building like an oasis and is connected with the galleries on higher levels with a narrow bridge that leads directly into rooms placed one above the other on all the 5 levels acting as a separate museum about the construction and architecture of the building itself. Experiencing the building While an artist -Gehry in this case-can have his own ideas about what emotions and experiences he wants to convey through the programmed spatial scenario of his building, still each person perceives the artist’s creation -the building of FLV in this case- uniquely. Also each critic, such as me, can have his or her own explanation and criticism of that experience. For me the Gehry’s idea to create a symphony of spaces, shapes, light, colour and water is more than understandable. However I personally doubt that he managed to fulfil this goal fully. While the wow-effect is definitely present and the intricate play of spaces, Buren’s colours and the majestic shapes of the sales are indeed breath-taking, still for me the bared structure of the building, exposing of which obviously was inevitable, somehow makes this fairy-tale experience banal. Others might argue that on the contrary, by exposing the power of the engineering Gehry actually inputs another experiential dimension, that of owe and bewilderment for human creativity, precision and engineering genius. In the official explanation of the building they even claim that the inner walls in the tower 3 have been left undisguised to expose the structure of the façade walls as an example. If this is sheer engineering-conditioned structure without any artistic exaggerations than to me this is an example of engineering which is raised almost to the point of artistry. Hadn’t it been covered accurately with erosion-preventing layers of grey paint and could it during the time acquire the rust and patina of times, it would definitely go for a magnificent art piece per se. Undisguised construction of the facade walls in tower 3 Metal girders holding the glass sails Whether the gallery spaces and movement in the museum is coherent enough is also perhaps subjective and depends on a person, just as the experience of terrace spaces and its winding hidden passages. Is it challenging your spatial orientation? Are the huge sales impressive in their scale, transparency and form? Do you find this building entertaining or boring, appealing to your senses or remaining mute? You have to find out the answers to these questions yourself by visiting this undoubtedly incredible building. All photographs © Yeva Ess

Toulouse au fil de la Garonne

Toulouse au fil de la Garonne

Il fait beau, il fait chaud... un soleil brûlant cogne sur les murs en brique de la ville rose, et, pour vous raffraichir rien de mieux qu'une ballade le long de la Garonne! Et oui, Toulouse sans la Garonne n'est pas Toulouse. Certes les berges de la Garonne n'ont pas de plage de sable fin mais... comme disait Nougaro "Moi mon océan c'est une Garonne"! Les berges de la Garonne sont sans doute un des must-do de Toulouse. Aménagée et piétonne, elles offrent une ballade agréable pour découvrir la ville rose. Coupant le centre ville en deux, la Garonne est accessible et idéalement située sur le parcours de nombreux touristes guidés par leur Cariboo (d'ailleurs voir mes visites en courant le long des berges de la Garonne!). Démarrons la ballade au niveau du Canal de Brienne. De là, après avoir longé la Garonne sur une centaine de mètre en arrive au niveau de la Place St Pierre (l'endroit où faire la fête ;) ). Ici, on a une superbe vue sur...la Garonne et... l'ancien hopital de la Grave et son dôme!. Puis la ballade continue pour arriver au niveau de la Daurade, quartier des beaux arts de Toulouse! Le parc de la daurade au pied de la Garonne, a été refait il n'y a pas si longtemps. Là, un bar concert enchantera des Touristes bien en soif après le début de la promenade. Après s’être désaltéré au son des quelques musiques endiablées dans ce parc en été, la marche continue pour arriver au pont neuf, un des plus beaux de Toulouse et un des plus anciens. Ensuite, après avoir traversé ce vieux pont toulousain, on arrive au château d'eau, lieu incontournable d'expositions photo contemporaine. On rejoint plus loin la prairie des filtres, sans doute avec le jardin des plantes un des plus beaux parcs toulousains. Agréable et idéalement situé, il offre un poumon de verdure au sein de la ville rose. Voilà comment en longeant simplement la Garonne on arpente en fait une des parties les plus agréables de Toulouse. D'ailleurs en été, les bords de Garonne sont très animés. Au programme: Toulouse plage, concerts...! C'est avec passion que je vous ferais découvrir la Garonne et au delà de celle-ci Toulouse! et juste pour le plaisir, les paroles de Claude Nougaro "c'est ma une Garonne" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJzMzlOpK0k

Berlin, terminus tout le monde descend !

Berlin, terminus tout le monde descend !

Berlin, terminus tout le monde descend ! Mais quelle idée tu as eu de choisir cette destination froide et tout de même assez éloignée de la France et de son littoral, puis le magret de canard du Sud-ouest d’où tu es originaire ne va pas trop te manquer ? Nous avons toujours des aprioris quand on parle de l’Allemagne. À vrai dire ils ont quand même bien fait parler d’eux ces cent dernières années, nos voisins d’outre-Rhin. La Grande Guerre, la crise de 29, la montée au pouvoir du chancelier Adolf Hitler puis la Seconde Guerre Mondiale. Que répondre à ces aprioris qui sont plutôt négatifs et donnent peut-être une vision faussée de cette nation ? Passion, amour de l’histoire, découverte et aventure, sont les maîtres mots à choisir pour une telle destination. Le départ est imminent, nos préjugés restés en France et l’esprit libre de toutes frontières intellectuelles. Nous partons vraiment dans le Grand Est alors ? Et oui chers amis, Berlin la capitale d’une nation qui a failli tous nous gouverner, européens que nous sommes. Nous pourrions citer cette nouvelle série télévisuelle qui prend sa source dans l’histoire Allemande : « The Man in High Castle : la série où les Nazis ont gagné la Seconde Guerre mondiale » à regarder ! Mais n’y pensez pas trop, ça aurez pu arriver. Les routes allemandes, en particulier les voies express que nous appelons autoroutes appartiennent à son peuple et sont totalement gratuites avec des tronçons où la limitation de vitesse n’existe plus. Artung me direz-vous, ils sont fous ces Germains. Pas tellement, à vrai dire il se trouve qu’il demeure une rigueur collective encore très visible. Et quand Moïse ouvra la mer en deux c’était pour libérer son peuple, en Allemagne c’est pour laisser passer les premiers secours que le bouchon se fend en deux. Ce n’est qu’une d’innombrables autres qualités que nous pouvons leur trouver. Une fois arrivé et après avoir posé le pied sur le sol froid et bétonné de Berlin, il y a une certaine inquiétude qui s’empare de vous comme si toutes les âmes qui ont traversées la ville voulurent que Berlin reste à jamais figée dans le temps. Du moins nous pouvons ressentir à travers cette atmosphère que la fin de la guerre ne remonte qu’a 70 ans. `` Ah tiens un garçon au crâne rasé tout de noir vêtu, une fille en peignoir dans le métro, un chien errant, la neige qui continue de refroidir l’air et puis ici on parle beaucoup « le russe » quand même". Si vous veniez d’une grande ville bourgeoise française à l’influence haussmannienne, Paris, Bordeaux etc, vous ne serez pas déçus du voyage car ici, c’est du béton. Un béton aussi attachant dans le sens où c’est l’utile et non le beau qui domine ici. Il n’est pas rare de voir des gens s’habiller en tenue de ski pour aller faire leur course, parce qu’après tout pourquoi pas ? La normalité n’a rien de normal, le packaging est bien moins lourd et polluant si on lui accorde moins d’importance. Beaucoup de détails font que la société allemande se positionne en tête dans les avancées technologiques et environnementales. Ici on ne recycle pas pour le plaisir ou pour se donner un genre « gentil bobo » mais car cela fait gagner de l’argent ou bien en économiser d’une certaine façon. Je vais m’arrêter la pour cette semaine car mes petits doigts fatiguent. Non, sans blague, j’aurais trop de chose à écrire sinon. Je vous dis à la semaine prochaine pour un autre article, sur les Start-Up et Berlin. Salut les Cariboo ! Just Bab

Cariboo is a formidable ice breaker !

Cariboo is a formidable ice breaker !

Cariboo is a community of travelers and locals, overall. At least it tend to be, and we’ll do our best to do so, and it is the just the beginning of the journey ! (I mean, for the guides and the travelers of course.)2017, time to create exceptional visits in every city 2017 will be awesome, and we will build a great community led by passion of the discoveries of all kinds. "My city for you" means more than a simple visit of a city like Paris. Basically you meet travelers you don't know, but they seem to be attracted by your visit and your way of doing it. So you start it over by showing a bit of your personality and then you walk, talk, show. Then, you realize during the tour that next time you should take another itinerary to have more things to say about a building in particular or a certain period. “Okay, I put it on my paper and I’ll consider it.” Otherwise, questions visitors ask can make you do some more research and become more aware of some stories. La Seine and its wonders One of my visits was "La Seine and its wonders", and it went pretty well. It doesn’t matter how many visitors were here, the only thing that matters is the passion. Once the local is all on form (despite this cold january), and that the visitor is ready to learn new things, contribute to a good atmosphere, the couple of hours is going to be interesting. What drives me to do tours for less : passion of this city Everyone is animated by passions. Some are animated by the passion of beverages, food, all sorts of arts, crafts… it can be specifically Music, Drawing, Paintings, Sculptures, Fashion… Basically, it doesn’t matter, the only thing is to discover common features between each other and bring new point of views. Needless to say that the passion for the city of Paris is truly here, and it is a good starting point. A well-deserved break So after than a bit more 5 km in the cold, Arctic Monkeys resonated in that comfy bar in Châtelet… Good time, good beers, good talk and good vibes. It is a good way to end a walk, isn’t it ? Don’t hesitate to contact me for a visit in English ! Alice

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